Document Actions

If not GDS, then what?

Computer Weekly - The closer we've come to the UK general election, the more it seems the Government Digital Service (GDS) is taking a public bashing. You might wonder why.

It's certainly true to say that GDS divides opinion across the public sector and among IT suppliers - it has become Marmite for many observers and practitioners of government IT; you either love it or hate it. That in itself is understandable - when any new organisation challenges the status quo, with its institutional inertia and entrenched vested interests, there will be a backlash.

Indeed, GDS quite deliberately set out to slay sacred cows - the model for government IT by the 2010 election was clearly broken, and Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude gave GDS a remit specifically to shake things up.

Some of the vested interests that GDS has upset deserved everything that came their way - the big system integrators raking in billions of pounds; the cosy relationships of old-school IT managers waiting out for their civil service pensions; the endless procurement cycles.

But the recent noises off feel different.

It's important to point out here that GDS is currently unable to defend itself against criticism - the pre-election purdah rules for civil servants mean it isn't allowed to offer a public perspective on its work. Of course that's great for anyone wanting to leak or publish critical information, knowing that nobody from GDS will be able to comment or counter.

But equally, that doesn't mean some of that criticism is undeserved.