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BSA Study Demonstrates Open Source's Economic Advantage

ComputerWorldUK - Glyn Moody - I love the spring. Not, of course, because of the glorious weather, since we don't have any. But because it's time for the annual BSA report on piracy, which is guaranteed to provide me with hours of innocent fun as I go through finding its methodological errors and dodgy data.

Long-suffering readers of this column may recall my previous discussions of these reports and their egregious flaws. For example, back in 2010, I pointed out that the BSA's claim that reducing PC piracy by 10% would create $142 billion in new economic activity was nonsense - the money saved by piracy does not simply disappear, but is spent elsewhere. In 2011, I noted that the BSA used the misleading phrase “commercial value of software piracy”, something repeated in 2012, when the BSA spoke of the “commercial value of this shadow market of pirated software” as if that had any relevance to what was happening on the ground.

So, with a certain excitement I began reading this year's report, intriguingly entitled “Competitive Advantage: The Economic Impact of Properly Licensed Software”. Here's the summary: